sexta-feira, 2 de novembro de 2012

Arturo Sandoval - A Time For Love

  1. Après Un Reve
  2. Emily
  3. Speak Low
  4. Estate
  5. A Time For Love
  6. Pavane Pour Une Infante Defunte (Pavane For A Dead Princess)
  7. I Loves You Porgy
  8. Oblivion (How To Say Goodbye)
  9. Pavane
  10. Smile
  11. All The Way
  12. Smoke Gets In Your Eyes
  13. Windmills Of Your Mind
  14. Every Time We Say Goodbye
A Time For Love

Arturo Sandoval is a true maestro: despite his reputation as a bop-based trumpeter who plays jazz inspired by his native Cuban tradition, he has delved deeply into tango, swing, and electric jazz in his long career. He is also a fine pianist and percussionist. That said, the notion of him recording a collection of classical pieces, standards, and ballads with a trio and a string orchestra as backing is more than a bit of a surprise. Nonetheless, that’s what A Time for Love basically is. Sandoval claims that this is the realization of a 20-year dream. He wanted it bad enough to make and release the record himself, but fate stepped in. Pianist Shelly Berg heard the demos and brought him to Concord’s Greg Field, who in turn brought in Grammy-winning arranger Jorge Calandrelli. They co-produced while Calandrelli arranged eight of the nine string charts -- Berg arranged the other and brought in his trio to back up Sandoval.

The classical readings include Fauré’s “Aprés un Reve" and “Pavane,” Ravel’s "Pavane Pour une Infante Defunte" (with Chris Botti on second trumpet), and Astor Piazzolla's “Oblivion” (with Monica Mancini on vocals). All reveal the emotional depth of Sandoval's playing, not just his technical acumen. While his fiery jazz playing can emote, it is often overshadowed by his expertise. Here, it is softness and tenderness without sentimentality that speak to the listener. The standards such as “I Loves You Porgy,” the shimmering swing in “Speak Low,” and the deep romance in the Johnny Mandel-Johnny Mercer classic “Emily” seemingly come from the vocal jazz tradition. Yet in them one can readily hear what Sandoval claims are his two greatest inspirations for this album: trumpeter Bobby Hackett's playing with the Jackie Gleason Orchestra, and the album Clifford Brown with Strings. The musical economy of those influences is reflected in the emotional weight and complex lyrical dimension carried in each note by Sandoval; the arrangements serve to heighten that revelation rather than overtake it. There are two very satisfying bonus tracks included as well, “The Windmills of Your Mind,” a stellar duet with Berg, and Cole Porter's “Every Time We Say Goodbye,” with Kenny Barron guesting on piano. It’s tempting to call A Time for Love Sandoval's masterpiece, but that is based on the sharp contrast with virtually everything else in his catalog; only time will reveal whether or not it is. For now, what is certain is that it is one of them.

(by Thom Jurek from allmusic.com)

A blazing, technically flawless trumpeter from Cuba, Arturo Sandoval has been dazzling audiences all over the world with his supercharged tone and bop-flavored flurries way up in the trumpet's highest register. In slower numbers, he sports a golden, mellow tone on the flügelhorn, marked with a sure, subtle sense of swing. Apparently he is capable of playing anything, proving it more than once by tackling classical repertoire as well as jazz in the same concert, and he has enough curiosity to search far beyond his Cubop base for repertory. Yet he often lets his desire to please the crowd with high-note displays get in the way of musical values, and he has yet to make a great record that can stand with those trumpet giants that have preceded him.

The son of an auto mechanic, Sandoval took up the classical trumpet at 12 and was enrolled in the Cuban National School of the Arts at 15, studying with a Russian classical trumpeter. Early in the 1970s, he became one of the founding members of the Orquesta Cubana de Musica Moderna, which by 1973 had evolved into the Afro-Cuban, rock-influenced band Irakere. Sandoval met his idol Dizzy Gillespie in 1977, who promptly became a mentor and colleague, playing with Sandoval in concerts in Europe and Cuba and later featuring him in the United Nation Orchestra. After recording an album with David Amram, Havana/New York, and a couple of high-profile Irakere albums on Columbia, Sandoval left the group in 1981 to tour with his own band and record in Cuba. Occasionally, the Castro government would allow Sandoval to appear in various international jazz festivals and with orchestras like the BBC Symphony and Leningrad Philharmonic. Though he chafed under a regime that restricted his touring, Sandoval bided his time until he could get his wife and son out of Cuba, and only then, in July 1990 during a long European tour, did he defect at the American Embassy in Rome, settling in Florida.

Signing with GRP, Sandoval's first American album, appropriately titled Flight to Freedom, demonstrated his versatility in several idioms, and he toured with his own high-energy Afro-Cuban group in the 1990s. Hot House followed in 1998, and a year later he returned with Americana. L.A. Meetings appeared in spring 2001. For 2003's Trumpet Evolution, Sandoval selected material from his favorite horn players. Since that time, he has released a handful of recordings including Live at the Blue Note in 2005 and Arturo Sandoval & the Latin Jazz Orchestra and Rumba Palace, both in 2007. In 2010, Sandoval released his first album for the Concord Jazz imprint, a collection of ballads entitled Time for Love.

(by Richard S. Ginell from allmusic.com)


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